VaNews

Monday August 03, 2015

Compiled by Bernadette Kinlaw


Executive Branch

GOV. MCAULIFFE ASKS RESIDENTS TO PREPARE FOR THE WORST THIS HURRICANE SEASON

By MIKE HIXENBAUGH, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe visited the Coast Guard base in Portsmouth on Friday to encourage Hampton Roads residents and business owners to get ready for hurricane season. The National Hurricane Center has predicted a below-average risk of tropical storms and hurricanes this year in the Atlantic, but McAuliffe said everyone in the region needs to have an evacuation plan.


MCAULIFFE TO SPEAK AT MAINE DEMOCRATIC PARTY LOBSTER BAKE

Associated Press

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe will soon visit Maine for the Democratic Party's annual summer fundraiser. The Democratic governor is headlining the party's Muskie Lobster Bake on Aug. 9.

General Assembly

GOP SAYS NO TO MCAULIFFE SUPREME COURT PICK, WILL TAP ALSTON INSTEAD

By TRAVIS FAIN, Daily Press (Paywall for certain articles)

General Assembly Republicans won't sign off on Gov. Terry McAuliffe's pick for the state Supreme Court, they announced late Sunday, going instead with Appeals Court Judge Rossie D. Alston. McAuliffe appointed Fairfax Judge Jane Marum Roush to the state's highest court last week, filling a vacancy that came up Aug. 1. With the legislature out of session, McAuliffe could take his pick. But to serve for very long Roush needed the General Assembly to elect her.


AG'S OFFICE: DOMINION BILL COSTING CUSTOMERS

By ALAN SUDERMAN, Associated Press

Customers of Dominion Virginia Power won't be getting as large a potential refund or see a rate reduction they otherwise could have been entitled to because of actions by the General Assembly in the last two years, according to a witness hired by the Attorney General's office.


VIRGINIA REPUBLICANS REVIVE TALK OF ABORTION IN WAKE OF VIDEO STINGS

By RACHEL WEINER, Washington Post

The recent video sting of Planned Parenthood by antiabortion activists has already become a Republican attack line in two fall elections that could decide control of the Virginia Senate. The surreptitious recordings, in which Planned Parenthood officials in California and Colorado discuss the harvesting of fetal tissue, have triggered outrage and calls for investigation in Congress and several states, including Virginia.

McDonnell Case

VA.’S TOP LAWYER: ROBERT MCDONNELL SHOULD LOSE HIS STATE PENSION

By RACHEL WEINER, Washington Post

Former Virginia governor Robert F. McDonnell should lose his pension because of his felony conviction, the state’s attorney general said Tuesday. In an advisory opinion sought by Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D), Attorney General Mark R. Herring (D) said that under a law McDonnell signed in 2011, the ex-governor must relinquish his benefits because he was convicted of a felony related to on-the-job conduct.


AG SAYS CURRENT GOVERNOR CAN STRIP MCDONNELL PENSION BENEFITS NOW

By MICHAEL MARTZ, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

An attorney general’s opinion on Friday cleared the way for Gov. Terry McAuliffe to strip the state pension benefits of his predecessor, former Gov. Bob McDonnell, without waiting for the end of appeals of the former governor’s felony corruption conviction.


ATTORNEY GENERAL OPINION PAVES WAY FOR REVOKING MCDONNELL’S PENSION

By ALAN SUDERMAN, Associated Press

Former Gov. Bob McDonnell’s pension benefits can be taken away based on a law he signed while governor, according to a legal opinion issued Friday by Attorney General Mark Herring. A jury in September found McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, guilty of doing favors for former Star Scientific CEO Jonnie Williams in exchange for more than $165,000 in gifts and loans. The couple have been sentenced to prison but are currently free on appeals.


AG OPINION: MCDONNELL TO LOSE STATE PENSION

By TRAVIS FAIN, Daily Press (Paywall for certain articles)

Former Gov. Bob McDonnell must lose his state pension under legislation that he himself signed into law, Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring said in an opinion released Friday. The law's intent was always clear: Government officials convicted of a felony for misconduct in office would lose their state pensions.

State Elections

MCPIKE OUTPACES PARRISH IN CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS

By JILL PALERMO, Prince William Today

Dale City Volunteer firefighter Jeremy McPike pulled in about $14,000 more than his Republican opponent, Manassas Mayor Hal Parrish, in June but Parrish remains well ahead of McPike when it comes to money in the bank.

State Government

VIRGINIA PORT AUTHORITY BOARD MOVES TO BUY SITE NEXT TO NORFOLK TERMINAL

By ROBERT MCCABE, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The Virginia Port Authority is in the process of snagging a strategically located piece of property on Hampton Boulevard. The port board last week signed off on a resolution authorizing the purchase of the former Acosta building, which backs onto Norfolk International Terminals.


WHAT HAPPENS TO THE CASH, ASSETS SEIZED FROM CAPTURED CRIMINALS?

By MARK BOWES, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

The more than $62 million in assets seized by Virginia law enforcement from suspected narcotics traffickers and other drug dealers in the past seven years range from the mundane to the insanely extravagant.


AFTER 50 YEARS, REFLECTING ON THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT AND ITS IMPACT, FUTURE

By TRAVIS FAIN, Daily Press (Paywall for certain articles)

It was 1965 and Henry Marsh sat incredulous as Virginia's former attorney general told a U.S. Senate hearing that the commonwealth didn't discriminate against black voters. What would eventually be known as the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was up for debate, and Virginia most certainly didn't want to lumped in with other Southern states.

Congress

HURT CALLS FOR VA AUDIT

By ALEX ROHR, News & Advance

In a week in which Congress passed a $3.4 billion gap filler for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs budget, U.S. Rep. Robert Hurt called for independent audits for the agency.

Economy/Business

ALPHA NATURAL RESOURCES TO SEEK CHAPTER 11

By MATT JARZEMSKY, Wall Street Journal (Paywall)

The ailing U.S. coal industry is about to get another black mark. Alpha Natural Resources Inc. is expected to file for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection early Monday morning to cut its more than $3 billion debt load, according to people familiar with the matter, as a severe slump in coal prices continues to wreck havoc on the industyr.

Higher Education

POLICING A UNIVERSITY WHERE 'EVERYBODY BELONGS'

By KARIN KAPSIDELIS, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

A friend snapped a picture of the Virginia Commonwealth University student sleeping soundly on the library floor, beneath a table where he’d left his laptop computer unprotected. The friend wasn’t there later to capture the image of the thief who took the laptop, but the VCU Police Department’s cameras were.

Virginia Other

JUDGE: VIRGINIA CAN BAN FUTURE CONFEDERATE LICENSE PLATES

By MICHAEL LIVINGSTON, Danville Register & Bee

A federal judge’s ruling in Danville on Friday paves the way to remove the Sons of Confederate Veterans logo — which includes the Confederate battle flag — from Virginia-issued SCV plates.


FEDERAL JUDGE RULES THAT VIRGINIA MAY BAN CONFEDERATE LICENSE PLATES

By ANTONIO OLIVO, Washington Post

A federal judge ruled Friday that Virginia can stop issuing specialty license plates that show the Confederate flag, following a recent Supreme Court decision that said such a ban does not violate the First Amendment. U.S. District Judge Jackson Kiser said he will issue a written order to address whether the nearly 1,700 Confederate license plates in use in Virginia may be recalled by the state.


JUDGE OKS VIRGINIA'S BAN ON CONFEDERATE FLAG LICENSE PLATES

By BILL BARTEL, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

A federal judge in Danville said Friday that Virginia can stop issuing license plates with Confederate battle flag emblems. But he left unclear what to do about 1,691 motorists who have the specialty tags. U.S. District Judge Jackson Kiser said during a hearing Friday he is ending an injunction he issued 14 years ago that blocked the state from banning the flag symbol on tags.


FEDERAL COURT: VIRGINIA CAN REMOVE CONFEDERATE FLAG FROM LICENSE PLATES

By JONATHAN HUNLEY , Leesburg Today

Judge Jackson Kiser ruled in federal district court in Danville today that the Confederate battle flag can be removed from Sons of Confederate Veterans license plates in Virginia, state Attorney General Mark R. Herring announced.


IN WESTERN VA., POLITICIANS' SUPPORT FOR DUMPING BATTLE FLAG PLATE MAY OUTPACE PUBLIC'S

By ALICIA PETSKA, Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Statewide, Virginia is perfectly purple on the Confederate battle flag — 46 percent support keeping it off state license plates and 45 percent think it should stay, according to the most recent poll.


SPEECHES, FLAGS MARK SUTHERLIN MANSION RALLY

By DENICE THIBODEAU , Danville Register & Bee

More than 300 Confederate flag supporters gathered at the Sutherlin Mansion Sunday to show their support for keeping the Third National flag of the Confederacy atop a war memorial on the mansion’s grounds.


COUNCILMAN OFFERS PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE ON FLAG DEBATE

By DEREK GOMES, Winchester Star (Subscription Required)

As the only African-American on City Council, John Hill feels a heightened responsibility as the panel considers removing the Confederate battle flag from the city seal. “I have an obligation to my grandparents and other blacks, young and old, to speak for them,” said Hill, who represents the Second Ward. “As long as the seal has the flag on there, it’s projecting an image I can’t get behind.”


MOUNTAIN VALLEY PIPELINE AND INTEGRATION AMONG DISCUSSIONS ON BOSTON-BASED PLATFORM

By YANN RANAIVO, Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

It’s cliche, but the Internet has changed a lot of things. It has changed the consumption of news, how movies are watched, how bills can be paid and even grocery shopping, among other things. But it has also changed the way people tackle serious local issues such as fights to keep utility companies from building on private property or police relations.

Local

DID RICHMOND SCORE BY LURING THE REDSKINS?

By JONATHAN O'CONNELL, Washington Post

Thousands of football fans are expected to bear temperatures in the 90s Thursday to pass through the gates at the Redskins training center in Richmond. Three years ago the city paid $10 million to build the center, anticipating an economic boost. That was on top of $4 million provided to the team by the state.


REDSKINS, VENDORS ADJUST TO LOWER ATTENDANCE IN OPENING DAYS OF TRAINING CAMP

By MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

The food truck court outside the Washington Redskins training camp sat empty Sunday. Of the original three vendors, two have been moved to locations near the camp’s entrance, while Strawberry Street Cafe has decided not to return.


CITY, SCHOOLS CLASH OVER ATTEMPT TO COLLECT $1.27 MILLION IN STORMWATER FEES

By K. BURNELL EVANS , Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Richmond Public Schools officials say they were blindsided last week by a letter from the city prodding them to honor an apparent verbal deal over late stormwater fees struck with the city’s then-chief executive last September. A conversation about the repayment took place, school administrators said, but Superintendent Dana T. Bedden and then-Chief Administrative Officer Byron Marshall did not set dates for collecting the roughly $1.1 million owed.


QUESTIONS (AND SMELLS) LINGER AROUND PROPOSED LANDFILL EXPANSION IN CHESTERFIELD

By NED OLIVER, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

When the Shoosmith Landfill in Chesterfield County starts to smell particularly ripe, workers turn on something akin to a massive air freshener, releasing a faint grape scent into the surrounding neighborhoods. “It’s not just a masking agent — it also neutralizes odors,” Fletcher Kelly, a co-owner of the landfill, which is located not far from the county government complex on Iron Bridge Road. “So it wasn’t a matter of a grape scent over a citrus scent over a pine scent.”


PORTSMOUTH UTILITIES DIRECTOR RESIGNS, OFFICIALS SAY

By JOHANNA SOMERS, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The flight of Portsmouth department heads continued Friday when Public Utilities Director Bryan Foster submitted his resignation letter. Foster told The Virginian-Pilot he has accepted a management position at a municipality in Northern Virginia. He would not disclose which one. His last day working for Portsmouth is Aug. 21.


LONG-VACANT CHESAPEAKE LAND EYED FOR MAJOR DEVELOPMENT

By MARY BETH GAHAN, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

After more than a decade of studies and failed projects, the 4,000-acre Frank T. Williams Farms in southern Chesapeake might finally become an economic hub for the city. The City Council asked City Manager Jim Baker in January to pursue a state-certified "mega-site" designation for the land, which means it would be shovel-ready for industrial or commercial use. In the months since, the city has thrown around ideas for bringing utilities to the site, which is just east of the Great Dismal Swamp and north of the North Carolina border.


NORFOLK SCHOOLS ON TRACK FOR SPENDING TARGETS

By CHERISE M. NEWSOME, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

After forfeiting parts of a federal grant earmarked for poor students, the school division is now on track to meet deadlines for spending the remaining money. Norfolk Public Schools has spent nearly 98 percent of a Title I grant that expires Sept. 30, according to financial documents requested by The Pilot. It has spent about 73 percent of a grant expiring in 2016. It must have that up to 85 percent by this fall.


BOARD OF SUPERVISORS VOTES TO LIMIT PUBLIC COMMENTS

By KANE KASHOUTY, Greene County Record

Greene County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday, July 28, to limit public comments at their future meetings. Supervisors voted 4-to-1 to a new set of rules for public comments at their meeting that will, among other things, limit comments to three minutes.


CITIZENS CALL FOR BROADBAND CONNECTION IN COUNTY

By CALVIN PYNN, Southwest Times

As most parts of modern life – including news, art, jobs and entertainment – are highly dependant on a reliable Internet connection, there are still a number of people without access to that service. As evidenced at Monday night’s Board of Supervisors meeting, a lot of those people live in Pulaski County.


Editorials

MCAULIFFE'S MYSTERY DONOR

Richmond Times-Dispatch Editorial (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s political action committee, Common Good Va., has given back a $25,000 donation. It’s just not clear whom it has given the donation back to. As the AP’s Alan Suderman reports, the donation came from Glinn USA Investments, which refused to certify its legality.


GO VIRGINIA - WITH CAUTION

Richmond Times-Dispatch Editorial (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Virginia’s leadership — governmental, business and educational — has closed ranks behind an economy-revitalizing proposal they’re calling Go Virginia. Details are scant — though a recent Commentary column by Dominion’s Tom Farrell and WestRock’s John Luke Jr. hinted at some. The broad strokes depict a near future in which localities work more closely with one another, and regional infrastructure projects move up on the state’s list of priorities.


A SHIELD -- OR A CLOAK?

Richmond Times-Dispatch Editorial (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

If a member of your family is killed, do you have a right to the police report? Most Virginians probably think the answer is obviously yes. In fact, it’s no.


VIRGINIA VOTER REGISTRATION FORM DOESN'T NEED CHANGE

Free Lance-Star Editorial

There's more tinkering going on with Virginia’s voting registration process. This will lead to more arguments about what the change will mean for the sanctity of casting a ballot in the commonwealth.


NOT READY FOR STATE POLICY

Virginian-Pilot Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

A plan to simplify Virginia's voter registration form by making responses optional to questions about felony convictions and citizenship status - while preserving their essence in an affirmation - has set off a partisan firestorm.


SPOTSYLVANIA BASEBALL STADIUM OUT AT HOME

Free Lance-Star Editorial

Minor league baseball's deadline for the Spotsylvania County Board of Supervisors to vote on a proposal by the Hagerstown Suns to partner with the county on a stadium has come and gone, effectively killing any deal, according to the most ardent baseball supporters. Despite a request for more negotiations over the $30 million project from the divided Spotsylvania board, Suns owner Bruce Quinn’s final offer made last month was apparently just that—the final offer. County officials received no indication that officials of the low-A South Atlantic League in which the Suns play were willing to allow negotiations to go any further.


LAWSUITS FILED IN U. VA RAPE STORY

Winchester Star Editorial (Subscription Required)

Perhaps there is no connection, but two stories that moved across the country last week certainly seem to be related. The Associated Press reported that “[t]hree University of Virginia graduates and members of a fraternity who were portrayed in a debunked account of a gang rape in a retracted Rolling Stone magazine story filed a lawsuit against the publication and the article’s author, court records show.”


FINE SHOULD NOT RESTRICT FREE SPEECH

Daily Progress Editorial

Just when you think public officials can’t possibly commit anything more outrageous — then they do. We give you case in point: the Petersburg City Council's refusal to let a man speak at a public forum because he owed an unpaid fine.


VIRGINIA'S OPPORTUNITY

Roanoke Times Editorial (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Opportunity is not knocking on Virginia’s door. But Virginia could go knock on Opportunity’s — depending on how we feel about the subject of tax credits to spur companies to do more business in the state. Those of us of a certain age grew up envying what North Carolina has done in terms of economic development. It built the Research Triangle before high-tech was even a buzzword. It set up banking laws so that Charlotte became a financial capital, and the banks there bought out ours. It even made North Carolina into Hollywood’s favorite destination for shooting movies outside of California or New York, and pocketed all the money that went with that.


CONGRESS MAKES THE WRONG MOVE ON COAL ASH RULES

Virginian-Pilot Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Like everything else in Washington, clean water and soil - which in a saner time Republicans and Democrats unified to support - now reflect the city's reflexive, destructive partisan divide. The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed its first regulations to cover coal ash, the stuff left over after the fossil fuel is burned for electricity or industry.

Columnists

SCHAPIRO: J. WARNER, SENATE OLD BULL, SEES NEW THREATS TO SECURITY

By JEFF E. SCHAPIRO, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

The old bull of the U.S. Senate is no Ferdinand, the fictional bull content to doze under a cork tree. At 88 — after fighting in two wars, helping to run a third, and authorizing presidents to wage others — John Warner, six years out of the Senate from which he retired after 30 as an influential voice on national security, says the United States can’t go it alone against the Islamic State and other threats.


WALZER: WHEN VA. GOV. TERRY MCAULIFFE COMES TO TOWN, IT'S SURE TO BE A SUPERLATIVE VISIT

By PHILIP WALZER, Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Attending a news conference led by Gov. Terry McAuliffe is like traveling to Superlative City. On Tuesday, the high-octane governor was at Half Moone Cruise and Celebration Center in downtown Norfolk to promote a new economic development plan. As in previous appearances, McAuliffe put Hampton Roads on a sky-high pedestal: “If we get the seven mayors in the region to work together, honestly, there is not a region on the globe that can compete.”


MATHEWS: MOM WANTED DAUGHTER TO FLUNK, BUT SCHOOL WOULDN’T BACK HER UP

By JAY MATHEWS, Washington Post

A Fairfax County mother has been telling me about her bewilderment at her bright but school-hating daughter’s passing English even though her second-quarter and third-quarter grades were F’s and she skipped the final exam. Having encountered earlier report card mysteries, the parent e-mailed all of her daughter’s teachers June 10, asking that she be given the marks she deserved.

Op-Ed

MCAULIFFE: A STARK CONTRAST IN WISE COUNTY

By TERRY MCAULIFFE, Published in the Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Two weeks ago, I stood on the Wise County Fairgrounds and witnessed the exciting opportunities available for our health care system through the use of modern, cutting-edge technology. At the same time, I was surrounded by 2,200 men, women and children waiting for medical assistance. For many, it would be the only care they receive this year. The contrast could not be starker.

Terry McAuliffe is governor of Virginia.


NORTHAM: A SOLUTION TO TEEN PREGNANCY IN VIRGINIA?

By RALPH NORTHAM, Published in the Washington Post

A privately funded initiative in Colorado that drastically reduced teen pregnancy and abortion rates has recently been lauded by public health officials, policymakers and editorial boards alike. As a physician, I’ve been closely following the outcomes and results of this public health initiative.

The writer, a pediatric neurologist, is lieutenant governor of Virginia and a Democrat.


LAROCK: WE MUST DO MORE TO LIMIT LATE-TERM ABORTIONS

By DAVE LAROCK, Published in the Winchester Star (Subscription Required)

When Cecile Richards, the president of America’s biggest abortion business, commented on a bill to ban painful late-term abortions on viable unborn children after 20 weeks gestation, she said it “lacks compassion and respect.” The irony of that comment is unbelievable.

Dave LaRock, R-Hamilton, represents the 33rd District in the Virginia House of Delegates.


SHEPPARD: THE NAACP IS MISGUIDED AGAIN

By R. GARY SHEPPARD, Published in the Winchester Star (Subscription Required)

The local chapter of the NAACP sent a letter to the Winchester City Council requesting they take action to remove the Confederate flag from the city seal because it is a message of hatred, racism, discrimination, white supremacy, and reflective of brutal images of slavery in the Confederacy. The NAACP is so misguided jumping on the fashionable current topic of the day.

R. Gary Sheppard is a resident of Winchester.


DRAKE: CONFEDERATE FLAG STANDS FOR LIMITED GOVERNMENT, LOCAL CONTROL

By GERALD L. DRAKE, Published in the Winchester Star (Subscription Required)

Political correctness and Socialist Marxist revisionism are attacking everything Southern and Confederate on national, state, and local levels all across America. The flag represents honor, faith, courage, dignity, integrity, chivalry, Christian values, respect for womanhood, strong family ties, patriotism, self-reliance, limited constitutional federal government, states’ rights, and belief in the free enterprise system.

Gerald L. Drake is a resident of Frederick County.


FRUEH: YES, CONFEDERATE FLAG IS RACIST

By JAMIE FRUEH, Published in the Daily News Record (Subscription Required)

The debate about the meaning of the Confederate battle flag is an important contemporary political discourse, but contributions on these pages that have expressed support for the flag miss an important aspect of the conversation.

Jamie Frueh lives in Harrisonburg.


WEBB: ENVIRONMENTAL ACCOUNTABILITY AND THE ATLANTIC COAST PIPELINE

By RICK WEBB, Published in the Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

We have been promised that the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline will be environmentally responsible. Gov. Terry McAuliffe made that promise when he joined Dominion in announcing the ACP project in September 2014. Dominion has since informed us of its commitment to protection of natural resources in a series of full-page ads.

Rick Webb is Coordinator of the Dominion Pipeline Monitoring Coalition, an organization of citizen volunteers, conservation groups, and environmental scientists convened in response to the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline.


FISHER: VIRGINIA'S BATTLE IN THE WAR ON DRUGS

By MAURICE S. FISHER, SR., Published in the Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

As one who treats persons with addictive problems, I read with interest The Roanoke Times articles concerning the ethical and legal travails of Dr. Steven J. Collins. Collins is the physician who has been stripped of his medical license and who now is serving time for dispensing and distributing oxycodone for non-medical purposes along with being in possession of copious amounts of child pornography.

Maurice S. Fisher Sr. is a mental health professional who lives in Fincastle.


HAUGH: FRACKING GIVES U.S. ENERGY SECURITY

By DOUGH HAUGH, Published in the Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

The claim that politics are a lagging indicator of the times seems especially true in light of Republican presidential primary candidates’ campaign promises of energy independence. Many of the top-tier contenders have vowed it as part of their recent campaign announcements. Old habits die hard.

Doug Haugh is the president of Mansfield Oil and a member of the Job Creators Network.


COYLE: PORTSMOUTH'S ABUSE CRISIS

By BETTY WADE COYLE, Published in the Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The community has been put on notice that Portsmouth Child Protective Services is in crisis. An investigation by WAVY revealed that in June the agency had 215 overdue reports and was understaffed by more than 50 percent. In a department that should have 19 workers, Portsmouth CPS only had nine.

Betty Wade Coyle was executive director of Prevent Child Abuse Hampton Roads, which is now called Champions for Children.


COBLE: TIME TO WALK THE WALK ON CLEAN WATERS

By KIM COBLE, Published in the Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

None of the leaders in the Chesapeake Bay Program disputes the importance of restoring the health of rivers, streams and the Chesapeake Bay. But the group’s recent annual meeting revealed a lack of commitment to specific actions that will get the restoration back on track. And it is clearly off track.

Kim Coble is a vice president at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.


LIEBERMAN: JIM WEBB COULD STAND OUT FROM THE PACK

By JOE LIEBERMAN, Published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Former Virginia Democratic Sen. Jim Webb caught my attention in his recent presidential campaign announcement when he extolled the virtues of bipartisan problem-solving: “We need a president who understands leadership, who has a proven record of actual accomplishments, who can bring about bipartisan solutions, who can bring people from both sides to the table to get things done,” Webb said.

Joe Lieberman is a former U.S. senator from Connecticut. He serves as national chairman for No Labels, a nonprofit that promotes bipartisanship.